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Table 3 Degree of agreement/disagreement on perceived utility and general attitudes regarding genome sequencing

From: Predispositional genome sequencing in healthy adults: design, participant characteristics, and early outcomes of the PeopleSeq Consortium

  No. (%)a
Strongly disagree Somewhat disagree Neither agree nor disagree Somewhat agree Strongly agree
Perceived utility of genome sequencing
 I learned something to improve my health that I did not know before 70 (14.6) 86 (18.0) 133 (27.8) 105 (22.0) 84 (17.6)
 Having personal genome sequencing made me feel like I have more control over my health 42 (8.7) 44 (9.1) 115 (23.8) 181 (37.5) 101 (20.9)
 What I learned from my personal genome sequencing will help reduce my chances of getting sick 83 (17.2) 104 (21.6) 175 (36.3) 78 (16.2) 42 (8.7)
 The information that I received about my genome will influence how I manage my health in the future 64 (13.3) 50 (10.4) 137 (28.4) 171 (35.5) 60 (12.5)
 I am disappointed that my results did not tell me more information 68 (14.2) 63 (13.1) 87 (18.1) 156 (32.5) 106 (22.1)
Attitudes regarding genome sequencing
 Personal genomic information should be part of a standard medical record 7 (1.5) 34 (7.2) 54 (11.4) 152 (32.2) 225 (47.7)
 Health insurance should cover personal genome sequencing 26 (5.5) 56 (11.8) 95 (20.0) 128 (26.9) 171 (35.9)
 Personal genome sequencing should only be available to people through their doctor 177 (37.3) 109 (23.0) 62 (13.1) 65 (13.7) 61 (12.9)
  1. aPercentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding. Percentages are not all based on denominator of 543 because of missing responses to some survey items. The percent of missing responses ranges between 11.0 and 13.1% (median = 11.8% missing)