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  • Correction
  • Open Access

Correction to: De novo and inherited TCF20 pathogenic variants are associated with intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and neurological impairments with similarities to Smith–Magenis syndrome

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Genome Medicine201911:16

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13073-019-0630-1

  • Received: 15 March 2019
  • Accepted: 15 March 2019
  • Published:

The original article was published in Genome Medicine 2019 11:12

Correction to: Genome Med (2019) 11:12

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13073-019-0623-0

It was highlighted that the original article [1] contained a typographical error in the Results section. Subject 17 was incorrectly cited as Subject 1. This Correction article shows the revised statement. The original article has been updated.

Correct statement:

“Of note, subject 17 of our cohort presented with mild delayed motor milestones, generalized hypotonia, and, in particular, dysmorphic features including midface hypoplasia, tented upper lips, along with sleep issues, ASD, food-seeking behavior, and aggressive behavior; these clinical features are similar to those reported in SMS.”

Notes

Declarations

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Baylor Genetics, Houston, TX 77021, USA
(2)
Northern Ireland Regional Genetics Service, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, UK
(3)
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
(4)
Nottingham Genetics Service, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK
(5)
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, TX 78207, USA
(6)
North West Thames Regional Genetics Service, 759 Northwick Park Hospital, London, UK
(7)
Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
(8)
Dell Children’s Medical Group, Austin, TX 78723, USA
(9)
Division of Genetic and Genomic Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital; and Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
(10)
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, United Arab University, Al Ain, UAE
(11)
Department of Pediatrics, Tawam Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE
(12)
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Genetics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
(13)
Department of Human Genetics and Metabolic Diseases, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
(14)
Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA
(15)
Department of Pediatrics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA
(16)
Centre de Génétique Humaine, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France
(17)
Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 0211, USA
(18)
Gene DX, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, USA
(19)
West Midlands Regional Clinical Genetics Service and Birmingham Health Partners, Women’s and Children’s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK
(20)
East Anglia Regional Genetics Service, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK
(21)
All-Wales Medical Genetics Service, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK
(22)
South East of Scotland Clinical Genetic Service, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK
(23)
North East Thames Regional Genetics Service, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK
(24)
South East Thames Regional Genetics Service, Guy’s Hospital, London, UK
(25)
Oxford Regional Genetics Service, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford, UK
(26)
Wessex Clinical Genetics Service, Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton, UK
(27)
The DDD Study, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK
(28)
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
(29)
Monique and Jacques Roboh Department of Genetic Research, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel
(30)
Present address: Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
(31)
Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
(32)
Present address: Mayo Clinic Florida, Department of Clinical Genomics, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA

Reference

  1. Vetrini F, et al. De novo and inherited TCF20 pathogenic variants are associated with intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and neurological impairments with similarities to Smith–Magenis syndrome. Genome Med. 2019;11:12. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13073-019-0623-0.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s). 2019

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